07/18 Tiny Homes’ Biggest Problem Is That The Law Can’t Decide What They Are

tiny house with man sitting on front step

“The best strategy is to build one and hope no one official will notice. Just remember to be nice to your neighbors.” Photo by Nicolas Boullosa

Tiny houses have a lot of appeal: price, simplicity, low running costs, and plain cuteness. But building and living in one might prove tricky, in the U.S. at least, thanks to their somewhat confused legal status.

According to Alyse Nelson of the Sightline Institute, tiny houses are “usually illegal.” The problem is a combination of building codes and zoning laws. Tiny homes are often too small to meet the minimum size requirements demanded by some codes. For example, the International Residential Code, writes Nelson, rules out many tiny home designs because of requirements like 70 square feet of floor space and a minimum of 7 feet in width and height.

Adding wheels to a tiny home can further complicate things, leading to the building being classed as a recreational vehicle. “One hurdle this creates for tiny housers is the problem of parking,” says Nelson, “since it’s illegal to live in an RV full-time outside of an official RV park. This is the case in Portland, Seattle, and Vancouver, British Columbia.”

Building and housing regulations, along with RV laws, vary from state to state, although that part shouldn’t bother you unless you actually do plan to use your tiny home as an RV. In practice, it’s usually best to ignore the rules and rely on the fact that these laws are rarely enforced. “THOWs (tiny homes on wheels) parked in the backyards of friends or family members, or even on property by themselves, likely stay there without official permission,” writes Nelson. It also pays to be a good neighbor. “Online tiny house advocacy groups encourage prospective tenants to get to know their neighbors and make sure they’re happy, because code enforcers are unlikely to knock on the door unless they receive a complaint.”

Red more – http://www.fastcoexist.com/3061760/tiny-homes-biggest-problem-is-that-the-law-cant-decide-what-they-are

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Elaine Walker