01/13 Tiny house, big problems

Nick Hinton and Nora Phillips became jacks-of-all trades for their tiny house project.

Nick Hinton and Nora Phillips became jacks-of-all trades for their tiny house project.


Trial and error might have been painful at times, but it worked well for the tiny home of Nick Hinton and Nora Phillips, which is nearly done, awaiting touch-up paint and a little tinkering with the hot water heater…

She’s been busy downsizing her closet and ingesting the small-space truths of “The Life Changing Magic of Tidying Up,” but the bigger struggle right now is finding a place to actually plant their new dwelling.

“Currently, on Bainbridge Island, we do not allow recreational vehicles as permanent residences,” she explained. “So if the tiny home was still on wheels, it would be considered a recreational vehicle. Now sometimes, people will take the wheels off a tiny home and put it on a permanent foundation, and that changes things.”

She noted that the best course of action for individuals interested in tiny living is to contact the city’s building official and [Washington state chapter leader of the American Tiny House Association], James Weaver.

“There are so many specifics,” Stickney added. “I hesitate to even get into the specifics because it’s really going to be a case-by-case situation. For a tiny house to be considered a permanent structure, the state would have to approve the structure and there would be building permits involved.”

It’s a complicated process that the planning commission might address as it moves to update the comprehensive plan, she said.

Read more – http://www.bainbridgereview.com/news/365173831.html

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Elaine Walker