05/03 Yurts gaining new interest with the tiny house movement

Matt Larivee prepares to sew the canvas walls of a yurt at the Powassan and District Union Public Library in Ontario
Matt Larivee prepares to sew the canvas walls of a yurt at the Powassan and District Union Public Library in Ontario
Yurts have always intrigued Linda Conway. In fact, when she moved to Nipissing a few years ago from Burlington, she “thought it was something I might like to do.”

“It’s a unique idea,” Conway said Saturday as she checked out what’s involved in constructing a yurt, the round tent-like structure that, for thousands of years, was the home of nomadic peoples in Mongolia and Turkey.

She was one of about 20 people taking in an introductory workshop at the Powassan and District Union Public Library [in Ontario, Canada] a taste of what will be presented at a two-day workshop in June.

“The history behind them is so fascinating,” Conway said.

While she’s lived in the area for the past three years, though, she hasn’t had the opportunity to actually build one, and she admits with the winters in the region, a yurt is not something she is likely to use as a year-round structure.

“Maybe on a temporary basis,” Conway said. “Something to put up on a piece of property and spend the summer in.”

But while Conway isn’t likely to winter in a yurt, workshop leader Matthew Larivee has no problem with such a living arrangement. He first learned about yurts eight or nine years ago, when he began to research living off the grid.

Read more – http://www.nugget.ca/2016/05/03/yurts-gaining-new-interest-with-the-tiny-house-movement

About Stephanie 669 Articles
A work-from-home mom of one princess, I love graphic design, web design, drawing, puzzles, video games, computers, crafts, crochet, and family gatherings. I believe everyone can live tiny, no matter the size of your house. To me, living tiny is a mindset that anyone can adopt and apply to their lives.